The Artist's Gaze: NADINE ROBBINS

Nadine Robbin’s work builds upon visual intuition and explores the concept of “personality”. She merges photography and painting into strong, uncluttered compositions drawing the viewer in by capturing an unspoken confidence, emotion or unique beauty. Nadine’s portraits garner attention from critics and collectors. John Seed from the Huffington Post, chose Nadine’s portrait “Mrs. McDonald” as one of his “Ten Memorable Paintings for 2013.” and her portrait "Moxie” is part of the impressive array of nudes in The Tullman Collection. Her portraits “The Rolling Buns” and “Acacia and the Bowman” have traveled to London to be included in the Royal Society of Portrait Painters. Nadines double portrait "The Golden Gown," has been hailed by critic Keith Shaw as an “American masterpiece." nadinerobbinsart.com

Nadine Robbin’s work builds upon visual intuition and explores the concept of “personality”. She merges photography and painting into strong, uncluttered compositions drawing the viewer in by capturing an unspoken confidence, emotion or unique beauty. Nadine’s portraits garner attention from critics and collectors. John Seed from the Huffington Post, chose Nadine’s portrait “Mrs. McDonald” as one of his “Ten Memorable Paintings for 2013.” and her portrait "Moxie” is part of the impressive array of nudes in The Tullman Collection. Her portraits “The Rolling Buns” and “Acacia and the Bowman” have traveled to London to be included in the Royal Society of Portrait Painters. Nadines double portrait "The Golden Gown," has been hailed by critic Keith Shaw as an “American masterpiece."

nadinerobbinsart.com

INTERVIEW with Nadine Robbins
The Artist's Gaze
Curated by Victoria Selbach
Sirona Fine Art Gallery 

When do you know you have made a significant connection to your subject and what does that feel or look like from your perspective?

In the case of my latest nude “Davida”, I loved the fact that the model gave me something that I wouldn’t expect from her. I don’t think she expected it either. She’s not pouting or being overtly sexual like you would see in an advertisement. She’s raw, confident, emotional, vulnerable and real. It’s almost like she’s not a model. I like the honesty of it.

Tell us about a strong reaction you have received to your work and the impact you sense it has made on the subject, viewer or the greater cultural landscape.

Again in the case of “Davida”, several people said she was very “naked”. She is. It doesn’t bother me at all since it’s a fact. I see nudity as power. It shouldn’t be hidden. Others have said she was beautiful. She’s is. She a statue. The female version of the statue of “David” by Michelangelo. Hence the name.

What is it about your personal journey that has brought your gaze to focus so deeply on women.

I’m emotionally driven and very aware of it. Women make me feel as though I’m part of a tribe. I have a deep connection with them that pushes me to grow as an individual and an artist.

Why this visual dialogue? What do you hope to accomplish through your work?

I hope my work captures the personality of individuals and draws in the viewer because they can relate to it. We are all human.

Tell us about your current series or work and how it may be different from the work submitted for the show (send a few images representing this other work.)

I don’t have any images yet of my new work. But I have a new series I’m starting for a show in Chicago, where I am going to explore the concept of “Bad habits and guilty pleasures”. I’m asking people to give something of them selves in order to show their humanity. So far food has been a common theme within this new series and it’s inspired me to possibly broaden the concept to include “pleasure” and combine it with my oyster paintings.

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