Anything But Painting The Figure

 Jan Anders Nelson is a classically trained artist working in a variety of mediums and subjects, based in the Northwestern United States.  Earning a Master of Arts from the University of Wisconsin in 1977, Jan also spent time living in New York City attending New York University, working on a series of drawings under the mentorship of fellow artist and friend Don Eddy.    Describing his artwork as hyperrealism, photorealism, or precisionism, this multidisciplinary artist captures the narratives and realities of the people and places in his life. Using his camera as a sketchbook, Nelson often relies on multiple photographs to help answer queries that arise in the studio. While his paintings and drawings are created using more traditional methods, his digital photography is oftentimes manipulated in photoshop and reworked by hand.  Jan's work has been exhibited at the Minnesota Museum of Art, Joslyn Museum of Art, Appleton Museum of Art, Knoxville Museum of Art and the New Hampshire Institute of Art as well as several invitational and juried shows internationally.  His work is in collections public and private including the Terry O. Herndon Collection.    "My Dad manages to produce photography that looks like paintings and drawings that look like photos." Maja Sophia Nelson-Shaffer, 2016  Jan Anders Nelson's work is represented by the Nicole Longnecker Gallery, Houston, Texas

Jan Anders Nelson is a classically trained artist working in a variety of mediums and subjects, based in the Northwestern United States.  Earning a Master of Arts from the University of Wisconsin in 1977, Jan also spent time living in New York City attending New York University, working on a series of drawings under the mentorship of fellow artist and friend Don Eddy.  

Describing his artwork as hyperrealism, photorealism, or precisionism, this multidisciplinary artist captures the narratives and realities of the people and places in his life. Using his camera as a sketchbook, Nelson often relies on multiple photographs to help answer queries that arise in the studio. While his paintings and drawings are created using more traditional methods, his digital photography is oftentimes manipulated in photoshop and reworked by hand.

Jan's work has been exhibited at the Minnesota Museum of Art, Joslyn Museum of Art, Appleton Museum of Art, Knoxville Museum of Art and the New Hampshire Institute of Art as well as several invitational and juried shows internationally.  His work is in collections public and private including the Terry O. Herndon Collection.  

"My Dad manages to produce photography that looks like paintings and drawings that look like photos." Maja Sophia Nelson-Shaffer, 2016

Jan Anders Nelson's work is represented by the Nicole Longnecker Gallery, Houston, Texas

Anything But Painting The Figure
Edited by Jan Anders Nelson
PoetsArtists Publication print-on-demand, digital, PDF
Virtual Exhibition (Artsy through Zhou B Art Center)
September-October 2018


STATEMENT FROM JAN ANDERS NELSON

We all have influences, some we are aware of, others acting silently.  These forces move us around through life, pushing or pulling in a variety of directions endlessly.  As artists, no matter what medium we work in, paint, poetry, video, dance, intermedia…,  we prize our creative individuality.  And yet those forces still exert their pressures on us.  As a young graduate student, working in my studio, I had an experience where Lucas Samaras stopped by to visit while at the University, lecturing on his work.  He looked at what was on my easel briefly and commented; “If I were standing on the ledge of a window high above the ground and you showed me this work, would it stop me from jumping?”  Criticism.  Push.  Pull.

We have all responded to calls where a juror is also curator of a major museum or a recognized artist.  How do we respond to that?  I have caught myself looking at the work the curator has selected in the past, and the artwork created by the artist for clues about whether my work might resonate for them, questioning what the chances are of acceptance if I submit to their judgement.  How have you reacted?  What if they have defined a theme for the call?  Will you make something special for it, pick something from your recent work that you believe fits, respond by sending whatever is next on your easel or the tip of your pen or perhaps pass on the call?  Push.  Pull.  

In this call, I am asking that you bring it.  I want to see what you treasure as your best example of your creative spark.  I do not care when it was produced, or what medium used.  I have no theme for you to filter with, no unifying structure defined for your consideration and only one caveat given to me by Didi after she polled the group:  No figurative painting.  So there is that.  I suppose the reason for this rule is that we have had a lot of figurative art calls, so mixing it up a little is good.  This should not be interpreted as a criterion that restricts subject matter from dealing with people or the human form.  Just no figure painting.

So, with no curatorial theme, what am I looking for?  You tell me.  Show me.  In editing this issue, the unifying factor will be defined by my decisions I need to make to meet the challenge I face in selecting from what will be a large catalog of works submitted in a variety of mediums.  I know the resulting publication, print or digital, will be gorgeous because I have already seen just how talented this group is.  I do not want you to make something you think will fit, I want to see what you know is uniquely you.  As for me, I will quote Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart; “I shall not today attempt further to define the kinds of material I understand to be embraced within that shorthand description, and perhaps I could never succeed in intelligibly doing so. But I know it when I see it.”

My reply to Samaras was something like; “I think it would make you jump.”  Push.  Pull.


GUIDELINES

Mediums: Photography, Digital, Video, Drawings, Sculpture, New Media, Visual Poetry, Traditional Painting (if not the figure or portrait).
Deadline: August 1, 2018

Traditional paintings should not contain the figure. This includes portraits as well.
Photography, digital, video, drawings, collage, visual poetry, sculpture, and new media may include the figure.

A selection of the accompanying artworks from the publication will be exhibited online on Artsy through the Zhou B Art Center. Artists interested in exhibiting their work on Artsy will be sent an agreement. Those artists participating must have the work available to offer through the Zhou B Art Center's Artsy page for a three months time-frame specified in the agreement. The commission basis of these virtual exhibitions is the standard 50%.

The cover artist selected by the editor will receive a complimentary print copy and a PayPal cash prize of $100.

Please read our standard guidelines before filling out the form below.

Prepare a folder as specified in our general guidelines. Include in the folder a text file including a short bio, CV or resume, and up to 10 high resolution images.

Name *
Name
http://

Other than the cover artist, PoetsArtists does not offer complimentary print issues other than for the tier which qualifies. Please make sure you are a member of our Patreon platform before submitting. This publication and virtual exhibition only applies to members.

If you are having difficulty submitting a folder, reach out to Didi Menendez. See email below in the green section.

 

 

 

 

Didi Menendez